OUR SERVICES

Ultrasound Guided Injections

(USGI)

Steroid injections, also called corticosteroid injections, are anti-inflammatory medicines which are used to treat a wide range of conditions.

A steroid injection administered under ultrasound guidance can be more targeted and can provide significant pain relief, reduce inflammation and improve joint mobility for those suffering with long-term joint pain, as well as in the management of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Medical Imaging Partnership has a huge amount of experience in delivering ultrasound guided steroid injections which are administered by highly experienced healthcare professionals.


   OUR SERVICES

Ultrasound Guided Injections

(USGI)

Steroid injections, also called corticosteroid injections, are anti-inflammatory medicines which are used to treat a wide range of conditions.

A steroid injection administered under ultrasound guidance can be more targeted and can provide significant pain relief, reduce inflammation and improve joint mobility for those suffering with long-term joint pain, as well as in the management of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Medical Imaging Partnership has a huge amount of experience in delivering ultrasound guided steroid injections which are administered by highly experienced healthcare professionals.


UGSI FAQs

You may have concerns or questions about having an Ultrasound Guided Injection at Medical Imaging Partnership and we have produced a list of Frequently Asked Questions which we hope you will find useful and will help you feel confident and comfortable.

They aren’t designed to replace an informed discussion with your own Clinician before your appointment. However, we will be able to answer any questions or concerns about the scan when you arrive for your appointment.

An injection is given to reduce inflammation and pain within a joint. They are frequently recommended for people with rheumatoid arthritis and other types of inflammatory arthritis including gout and pseudo gout. They may also be recommended for osteoarthritis if your joints are very painful or if you need pain relief in addition to your normal medication.

Ultrasound is a type of imaging that uses high-frequency sound waves. The ultrasound probe detects sound waves that are bounced back from different structures in the body, producing an image on a monitor. An ultrasound scan can detect needles inserted into the body and therefore can be used to target your injection and to exactly the right spot.

An injection into a joint is called an intra-articular injection, and it can be made up of a corticosteroid combined with a local anaesthetic to reduce your discomfort. It can be directed into or around the joint to reduce swelling (inflammation), stiffness and pain.

If you have pain or inflammation near an affected joint, you will probably be given an injection into this tender area rather than the joint. This is called a periarticular or soft tissue injection.

Steroids are a type of medicine, which can be given as tablets or injections. Steroid injections come in different formulas; some act very quickly others are slower acting but longer lasting.

Steroid injections reduce inflammation, which helps to ease pain and reduce stiffness.

They are used for any inflammatory arthritis and sometimes for severe osteoarthritis, for gout and other inflammatory joint conditions and for conditions affecting the muscles, tendons and other soft tissues.

Evidence suggests steroid injections administered under ultrasound guidance are far more accurate than without. Needle placement can be carefully monitored and can target the problem area. 

Ultrasound-guided steroid injections can provide significant pain relief, reduce inflammation and improve joint mobility for those suffering with long-term joint pain, as well as in the management of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Ultrasound guided injections can be beneficial to reduce localised pain. They will not cure the underlying cause, but they may help improve your symptoms for up to several months.

With less pain, you may find you can do more physical activity, helping the joint to feel more comfortable. This can improve sleep and make everyday activities easier to manage. Some people find that they can reduce or stop taking painkillers after consultation with their Clinician.

Along with physiotherapy, injections can sometimes help avoid the need for surgery.

Some people gain immediate pain relief; others may not notice anything for a couple of weeks after the injection. And the results vary from person to person – it does not work for everyone.

Yes. Side-effects can include:

  • Bruising at the injection site

Rare side effects include:

  • A temporary flare-up of your joint pain
  • Hot flushes or mood swings
  • Feeling feverish, tired and sick
  • Headaches
  • Allergic reaction to local anaesthetic

Injections can occasionally cause some skin thinning or changes to skin colour at the injection site. While the procedure is always performed under sterile conditions, as with all procedures, there is a small risk of infection. All these are rare events (they are known to affect between 1 in every 1000 and 1 in every 10,000 people). If the area injected becomes red, hot and swollen, and/or you feel feverish, it is important to seek medical advice immediately.

Once the numbing effect of the local anaesthetic wears off, the area can sometimes feel tender for up to 48 hours before the corticosteroid starts to work. This affects about 1 in every 10 people. Occasionally the pain can be quite bad, but that does not mean the injection has not worked.

If you are diabetic, your blood glucose levels may increase temporarily (please see ‘What happens before the procedure?’).

You may find it is useful to wear loose clothing or clothing that can either be easily removed or rolled-up to expose the treatment area.

If you are on Warfarin or any other blood-thinning tablets, make a note of your INR (International Normalising Ratio). This should be stable at 3 or below.

Please follow the arrival instructions as set out in your appointment confirmation letter.

You will be asked to complete a health questionnaire prior to the procedure, which will be checked with the Clinician undertaking the procedure who will be a Radiologist or Specialist Doctor. Please ensure you advise the Clinician if you are:

  • Taking any of the following medication:
    • Warfarin
    • Aspirin
    • Clopidogrel (Plavix)
    • Zyban (Bupropion)
  • A diabetic as the steroid may temporarily affect your sugar levels for about 24 hours after the injection, so you will need to carefully monitor your levels of blood glucose and adjust your medication if necessary. If you have haemophilia (meaning your blood does not clot), there could be an increased risk of bleeding into the joint.
  • If you have an infection, have recently tested positive for MRSA or been prescribed antibiotics.
  • If you are pregnant or think you could be.

The procedure will be explained to you, including any risks and you will have an opportunity to ask any questions. You will then be asked for consent to continue with the procedure. For more information about Informed Consent please visit: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/consent-to-treatment/

The procedure will be performed by a Clinician trained in performing ultrasound guided procedures. The Clinician will explain the benefits and risks of having the injection and will answer any questions you may have.

You will be positioned on the ultrasound couch. The Clinician will perform an ultrasound to identify the area requiring an injection. The skin is cleaned with a sterile solution.

The procedure is performed under aseptic conditions to reduce the risk of infection. A small needle will be inserted into the site of the pain under ultrasound image guidance. A local anaesthetic will first be injected followed by the steroid injection. The needle is removed and a plaster or dressing is applied.

The procedure takes around 15 minutes. Your appointment may take around 30 minutes in total, depending on how you are feeling afterwards.

The injection will involve a small needle and will be similar to a blood test. If the area is very inflamed there may be more discomfort and you should tell the Clinician if you are finding the pain difficult to tolerate.

The injection may cause stinging briefly before the area becomes numb. There may be a pressure sensation or tightness for injections into joints.

Immediately after steroid injection, you may feel that your pain has gone or is significantly reduced. This is due to the local anaesthetic and the effect will last for a few hours. The steroid usually starts to work in three to four days but may take longer. The effect of the steroid injection varies from person to person, and a few people may not experience any benefit. Symptoms can be relieved for a few weeks to a few months.

You will be required to remain in the department for 10 minutes after the procedure. We strongly recommend that you are accompanied to the department by a responsible adult and advise that you refrain from driving for the remainder of the day. Your insurance may be void if you are involved in an accident. You should rest the area that has been injected for 1-2 days.

Yes, subject to any infection control restrictions. However, your relative/friend may be asked to leave the ultrasound room during the procedure.

Yes,  you are able to eat and drink as normal, although some people may feel nauseous for a while after their treatment.

Single steroid injections should not affect your fertility or pregnancy. However, if you are pregnant or think you could be you should let the Clinician know before you have a steroid injection.

Although small amounts of steroid may pass into the breast milk, this is very unlikely to be harmful to your baby. However, you should discuss the risks with your Clinician before your treatment.

  • You are advised to delay a local steroid injection for a minimum of 2 weeks following a COVID vaccination.
  • You are advised to delay a COVID 19 vaccination for a minimum of 2 weeks following a local steroid injection.
  • Other vaccinations may be administered as usual after local steroid injections.

Making an appointment

Ultrasound guided injections for NHS patients 

If you are an NHS patient having an ultrasound guided injection at a Medical Imaging Partnership site or centre, will need a referral from your GP or healthcare professional.

Medical Imaging Partnership also works in partnership with a number of NHS providers supporting them in the delivery of their diagnostic requests. They may have transferred your care to us and we will be in touch with you to arrange a convenient time, date and location for us to undertake your investigation.

Learn more

Booking an appointment for a private ultrasound guided injection 

We offer ultrasound guided injections to patients with private medical insurance, or those who wish to self-pay.

If you would like to make an appointment for an ultrasound guided  injection, please complete our General Enquiry and Appointment Form or call us on 01293 534 043.

You will need a written referral from a healthcare professional to have an ultrasound guided injection with Medical Imaging Partnership. If you do not have a referral, please contact our team who will be happy to discuss your options.

    General Enquiry and Appointment Form

    Whether you have a general enquiry or are enquiring about making an appointment, we'd love to hear from you. Please complete the form below, or you can call us on

    01293 534 043

    Tel: 01293 534 043
    Email: enquiries@medicalimaging.org.uk

    Medical Imaging Partnership Ltd.
    Unit 7, The Pavilions, Brighton Road, Pease Pottage, Crawley,
    West Sussex RH11 9BJ